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6 Savory Maple Pairings You Should Really Try

Peanut butter and jelly. Chocolate and vanilla. Cereal and milk. As we thought about these classic culinary couplings, we wondered what was the peanut butter to real Vermont maple syrup’s jelly? Pancakes, sure. Fruit, of course. Pork chops? You bet! Maple seamlessly combines with savory ingredients as well as it does the sweet ones. If you haven’t mixed maple syrup into dinner yet, we hope to introduce your palate to a few new favorite pairings.

While we undoubtedly love French toast for dinner, maple syrup can be used beyond absorbent carbohydrates. The robust dimension of real maple syrup can also star opposite pantry staples like soy sauce or miso in what may be cooking’s greatest balancing act: sweet and savory.

But this combination isn’t always invited to the table. We’ve come across recipes, like apple sauce, suggesting to omit maple syrup in order to achieve a more savory result when serving dinner. With all due respect to those recipe notes, we would advice you to make it with maple anyway! We’re confident you’ll find that a little bit of maple won’t turn your pork chop dinner into a decadent dessert. Instead, it’ll add dimension of flavor that will have you ready to scoop seconds after the first bite.

Without further ado, here are 6 savory pairings we love to match with real Vermont maple syrup.


Miso

Miso collides with maple to create explosive flavor. The Japanese fermented soybean paste is a staple in the kitchen, and, as you might expect, we think real Vermont maple syrup is too. Together they’re dynamic, making a home cooked meal taste Michelin rated. Whisk miso and maple syrup together for a marinade to coat salmon, a sauce to top noodles, or a dressing to coat greens.

Miso Maple Sauce

Soy Sauce

I don’t think two things have hit it off so well since ketchup and mustard. Maple syrup and soy sauce are seemingly made for each other. Salty and sweet, this pairing gives chocolate covered pretzels a run for their money. We use soy sauce and real Vermont maple syrup together for marinades, salad dressings and dipping sauces.

Creamy Peanut Lime Dipping Sauce
One Pan Salmon Dinner
Maple Sesame Dressing

Winter Squash & Vegetables

Fall’s favorite flavor is featured in a bevy of the season’s recipes. From stirred into sweet potatoes to pumpkin spice to coating brussels sprouts, just a spoonful of maple syrup makes a regular recipe a little more seasonal. But vegetables and maple syrup go together year round! Enjoy the shaved brussels sprouts salad with maple mustard dressing in the winter and summer.

Crispy Smashed Potatoes with Maple Yogurt Spread
Refrigerator Quick Pickles

Oats & Seeds

Granola doesn’t have to satiate a sweet tooth. Maple syrup is a natural sweetener, but using it in a recipe won’t sugar coat an entire batch. Stir maple syrup into batches of nutty granola or toss into the mix when roasting seeds to amplify flavor.

Spicy Maple Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Meat (Steak, Chicken, Pork)

Meat and maple make a merry combination. Maple mixes into marinades seamlessly, accentuating the spices that infuse a cut of steak, chicken or pork with flavor. Think of maple syrup as a seasoning and add a tablespoon or two into homemade barbeque sauces and overnight marinades. Venture into the world of compound butters. Mixing herbs, maple syrup and spices into butter allows for an extra surge of flavor to top pan seared steak or two rub over a roast chicken.

Roast Pork Tenderloin with Apples
Five Spice Maple Chicken Skewers

Eggs

We let maple syrup cascade down the pancakes and pool under the eggs on our breakfast plate. And it’s really good. Whether a stream of real maple syrup is breaking through the bacon dam and grazing the scrambled eggs or you’re whipping up a frittata, we encourage you to give this hearty combination a try.

Apple Frittata with Cheddar and Thyme

The mix-and-match possibilities of real Vermont maple syrup and savory dishes are abundant. Like all seasonings, tweak the amount used to taste! Real Vermont maple syrup can be the star of the meal but it can also be used in a supporting role to accentuate the savory flavors on the menu.